Haig’s War Diaries and Letters 1914-1918

Extract ‘Reports up to 8am most satisfactory. Our troops everywhere had crossed the Enemy’s front trenches.’ –Haig, Diaries and Letters, p.195, 1 July 1916 Introduction/Context This is an extract from the volume of Haig’s War Diaries and Letters 1914-1918, published in 2005. Douglas Haig was a senior officer of the largest British Army to date,Continue reading “Haig’s War Diaries and Letters 1914-1918”

Jack Martin’s Diary

Extract ‘Presently the tanks came along. They had to drop down the bank about six or eight feet, wallow through the mud and climb the opposite bank. One came over the top of the Signal Office and again we feared for the safety of those inside but there was no need to worry. Another gotContinue reading “Jack Martin’s Diary”

What challenges did propaganda present for journalism in the 20th century and were they overcome?

Introduction From the late nineteenth century onwards, war and the mass media have ‘enjoyed a long, intricate relationship’ which only intensified with the growth of technology during the twentieth century.[1] Information from overseas correspondents could be relayed faster than ever before and the variety of mediums over which it was presented increased, allowing reporters toContinue reading “What challenges did propaganda present for journalism in the 20th century and were they overcome?”

DISSERTATION – Constructing out of the Destructive: Understanding the Great War Through the Medium of Art, 1914-1919.

Introduction: According to modern British historian Dan Todman in 1998, the British population believed that ‘only the words of a tiny band of warrior poets could communicate the truth’ about the Great War.[1] This highlights the dominance poetry has had on influencing modern perceptions of the First World War, in comparison to other contemporary mediumsContinue reading “DISSERTATION – Constructing out of the Destructive: Understanding the Great War Through the Medium of Art, 1914-1919.”

How accurate are British popular memories of the Great War?

Introduction Most of the British adult population will have grown up hearing stories of a relative’s experience of the Great War.[1] However, since the late 1970s, the number of veterans alive rapidly diminished and today – 100 years since the Armistice – there are no surviving veterans.[2] As a result, the younger half of theContinue reading “How accurate are British popular memories of the Great War?”

‘Needless slaughter’. How accurately does this describe the Battle of the Somme from 1 July 1916 to 18 November 1916?

Introduction The Battle of the Somme is arguably, as stated by revisionist historian Gordon Corrigan, “more deeply ingrained in British folk memory than any other episode of the Great War.”[1] This British public hold the popular belief that distant generals sent soldiers across No-Man’s-Land to be slaughtered by the Germans.[2] For this reason, the battleContinue reading “‘Needless slaughter’. How accurately does this describe the Battle of the Somme from 1 July 1916 to 18 November 1916?”