EPQ

Was the Holocaust an example of how human behaviour can be taken to extremes of evil in pursuit of an inhuman objective?

Introduction

“The human reason is able to justify any cruelty by showing that it is necessary, part of a process.”

Chapter 1: How the Totalitarian Ideology of Nazi Germany shaped the ‘evil’ aspect of the inhuman objective

There are many instances in history when the Jewish community have found itself being the target of hatred and discrimination. Christians have blamed them guilty for the death of Christ, which is commonly referred to as Jewish deicide, and resented them for becoming money lenders charging interest as this goes against the principles of Christianity.Continue reading “Chapter 1: How the Totalitarian Ideology of Nazi Germany shaped the ‘evil’ aspect of the inhuman objective”

Chapter 2: Complicity in the demoralisation of the victims explained by Milgram’s study on obedience

Before concentration camps, temporary Ghettos, reflective of a slum area, in order to restrict the Jewish community were opened across German-controlled Europe. These were towns walled off from the German community with the purpose of isolating Jews[1]. Despite their isolation, families were allowed to live together and were still able to practice their religion[2]. However,Continue reading “Chapter 2: Complicity in the demoralisation of the victims explained by Milgram’s study on obedience”

Chapter 3: Reluctance from other countries to put an end to the Holocaust explained by Piliavin’s theory of Diffusion of Responsibility

The original method used for intentional execution was shooting the prisoners in batches at a mass grave. However, this method wasn’t efficient enough for the Nazis as it required guards to carry out the execution, which also had a negative mental impact on them.  Mobile gas vans were introduced as a more impersonal method ofContinue reading “Chapter 3: Reluctance from other countries to put an end to the Holocaust explained by Piliavin’s theory of Diffusion of Responsibility”

Chapter 4: The inhuman actions contrasted with the resistance towards the Holocaust explained by Kohlberg’s theory of Moral Development

          “Catchers” is a term that was used to describe members of the Jewish community selected to round up Jews and hand them over to the Nazis. Stella Goldschlag, also by the surname Kuebler, was subject to torture and forced labour. She was later recruited by the Gestapo, Hitler’s secret police, for her “computer-like memoryContinue reading “Chapter 4: The inhuman actions contrasted with the resistance towards the Holocaust explained by Kohlberg’s theory of Moral Development”

Conclusion

In conclusion, to answer the question “was the Holocaust an example of how human behaviour can be taken to extremes of evil in pursuit of an inhuman objective?”, it can be argued that the history of prejudicial attitudes towards the Jewish community which had been implanted into the minds of the then current German populationContinue reading “Conclusion”

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