Haig’s War Diaries and Letters 1914-1918

Extract ‘Reports up to 8am most satisfactory. Our troops everywhere had crossed the Enemy’s front trenches.’ –Haig, Diaries and Letters, p.195, 1 July 1916 Introduction/Context This is an extract from the volume of Haig’s War Diaries and Letters 1914-1918, published in 2005. Douglas Haig was a senior officer of the largest British Army to date,Continue reading “Haig’s War Diaries and Letters 1914-1918”

The Hippocratic Oath

Extract “I swear by Apollo the healer, by Aesculapius, by Health and all the powers of healing, and call to witness all the gods and goddesses that I may keep this Oath and Promise to the best of my ability and judgement.            I will pay the same respect to my master in the Science asContinue reading “The Hippocratic Oath”

Book Review: Jean Chalaby’s The Invention of Journalism

Jean Chalaby’s The Invention of Journalism focuses on the emergence of the journalistic field during the second half of the nineteenth century, challenging the traditional view that journalism appeared with the first gazettes and handwritten newsletters.  Chalaby is holistic in his approach, stressing that discourse is not limited to linguistics and must also consider theContinue reading “Book Review: Jean Chalaby’s The Invention of Journalism”

Why would an early modern individual collect and display natural and artistic objects in a cabinet of curiosities?

Introduction Traditionally, collecting was an exclusively male practice, occurring in their space reserved for scholarly activity.[1] Cabinets of curiosities were early modern private repositories for objects considered extraordinary, which ultimately set the foundations for the concept of the modern, institutionalised museum.[2] During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, natural objects were collected, studied, sold, and consumedContinue reading “Why would an early modern individual collect and display natural and artistic objects in a cabinet of curiosities?”

What does the research and other academic and professional literature suggest about the challenges that children and their teachers face when learning and teaching historical evidence?

Note: I have only published Part 1 of a total of 3, as Parts 2 and 3 (a commentary on my own scheme of work; an evaluation of Part 2 and assessment for learning) discuss the my pupils’ work. Introduction History is an enquiry-based subject; enquiries are attempts to answer specific questions about the pastContinue reading “What does the research and other academic and professional literature suggest about the challenges that children and their teachers face when learning and teaching historical evidence?”

Jack Martin’s Diary

Extract ‘Presently the tanks came along. They had to drop down the bank about six or eight feet, wallow through the mud and climb the opposite bank. One came over the top of the Signal Office and again we feared for the safety of those inside but there was no need to worry. Another gotContinue reading “Jack Martin’s Diary”

Why is Vesalius important in the history of anatomy? In what ways does he continue Galenic anatomical notions? In what way does he depart?

Introduction Vesalius (1514-1564), working in the anatomical renaissance of the sixteenth century, is regarded by medical historians as being the “father of modern anatomy.”[1] Ranked alongside Hippocrates, Galen, and William Harvey, Vesalius is among the greatest physicians and discovers in the history of medicine.[2] Valeria Finucci goes so far as to say that Vesalius’ anatomicalContinue reading “Why is Vesalius important in the history of anatomy? In what ways does he continue Galenic anatomical notions? In what way does he depart?”

What challenges did propaganda present for journalism in the 20th century and were they overcome?

Introduction From the late nineteenth century onwards, war and the mass media have ‘enjoyed a long, intricate relationship’ which only intensified with the growth of technology during the twentieth century.[1] Information from overseas correspondents could be relayed faster than ever before and the variety of mediums over which it was presented increased, allowing reporters toContinue reading “What challenges did propaganda present for journalism in the 20th century and were they overcome?”

DISSERTATION – Constructing out of the Destructive: Understanding the Great War Through the Medium of Art, 1914-1919.

Introduction: According to modern British historian Dan Todman in 1998, the British population believed that ‘only the words of a tiny band of warrior poets could communicate the truth’ about the Great War.[1] This highlights the dominance poetry has had on influencing modern perceptions of the First World War, in comparison to other contemporary mediumsContinue reading “DISSERTATION – Constructing out of the Destructive: Understanding the Great War Through the Medium of Art, 1914-1919.”

Examine the figure of the female flâneuse in Virginia Woolf’s work, with particular focus on Mrs Dalloway.

Introduction The term ‘flâneuse’ can be attributed to females who engage in flânerie: the act of observing the city whilst walking.[1] They know themselves to be one of the public, yet they are the binary opposite to the engaged pedestrian – they are a passive spectator.[2] Until the latter half of the nineteenth century, flânerieContinue reading “Examine the figure of the female flâneuse in Virginia Woolf’s work, with particular focus on Mrs Dalloway.”